Posted 47 minutes ago

nihileigh:

When we live in a world where you can access free content of naked consenting women in less than 5 seconds, why are people still invading the privacy of non-consenting women for nudes?

Hint: It has something to do with people feeling entitled to making any woman their personal porn, even if it violates or humiliates her in the process.

Posted 8 hours ago
Posted 19 hours ago

hollyhocksandtulips:

Glass Pool Inn, Las Vegas, 1950s.

So sad this is no longer there (demolished in 2004).

Posted 20 hours ago
Posted 1 day ago
aww-tistic:

grrak:

rynvasnormandy:

GUYS YOU HAVE NO IDEA HOW WONDERFUL THIS IS 
Parkinson’s is a degenerative disease and while it’s progress can be slowed down, it currently doesn’t have a cure. People suffering from Parkinson’s will experience a gradual loss of coordination and ability to perform even the most basic of every day tasks, including feeding themselves. 
This fucking spoon is HUGEfor them. Look at that gif of the man just trying to eat with the regular spoon and compare it to the liftware device. It’s NOT just a spoon, by the way, it comes with a fork as well, for example. 
I found the website for the project where you can purchase a spoon for someone you know/love and even possibly donate money to help someone out who can’t afford it themselves right: HERE.
At the very least, please spread this for all the people who have Parkinson’s or loved ones with Parkinson’s. 
You’ll help them take part of their life back. 

that’s cool

PEOPLE HAVE BEEN TAKING OUT THE ABOVE INFORMATION AND JUST REBLOGGING THE PICTURE.  IF YOU CAN REBLOG THE PICTURE, YOU CAN REBLOG THE LINK TO ACTUALLY HELP PEOPLE.  THANKS.

aww-tistic:

grrak:

rynvasnormandy:

GUYS YOU HAVE NO IDEA HOW WONDERFUL THIS IS 

Parkinson’s is a degenerative disease and while it’s progress can be slowed down, it currently doesn’t have a cure. People suffering from Parkinson’s will experience a gradual loss of coordination and ability to perform even the most basic of every day tasks, including feeding themselves. 

This fucking spoon is HUGEfor them. Look at that gif of the man just trying to eat with the regular spoon and compare it to the liftware device. It’s NOT just a spoon, by the way, it comes with a fork as well, for example. 

I found the website for the project where you can purchase a spoon for someone you know/love and even possibly donate money to help someone out who can’t afford it themselves right: HERE.

At the very least, please spread this for all the people who have Parkinson’s or loved ones with Parkinson’s. 

You’ll help them take part of their life back. 

that’s cool

PEOPLE HAVE BEEN TAKING OUT THE ABOVE INFORMATION AND JUST REBLOGGING THE PICTURE.  IF YOU CAN REBLOG THE PICTURE, YOU CAN REBLOG THE LINK TO ACTUALLY HELP PEOPLE.  THANKS.

(Source: 4gifs)

Posted 1 day ago
autopsynecropsy:

A pebble and 190 years of tragedy
Who could have dreamt that the throwing of a pebble by a jilted teenage lover could have such consequences?
On a country hillside near Bristol, John Horwood, 17, saw his sweetheart Eliza walking out with another love. In his frustration, he picked up a pebble and threw it at her. 
By a curse of fate, his aim was too accurate. It hit Eliza on her right temple. She fell into a brook and later went to Bristol Royal Infirmary to get the small wound dressed properly.
But the chief surgeon Richard Smith said it had become infected and decided to operate. His method was trephining ― or, put more crudely, drilling a hole in her head to relieve the pressure of the infection. His treatment caused an abscess and seven days later Eliza Balsum died.
Dr. Smith alerted the police and the hapless stone thrower was brought to trial at the Star Inn in Bedminster, Bristol, for murder. The year was 1821 and, in an incredible decision to modern eyes, he was sentenced to death and hanged at New Bristol Gaol on April 13th, three days after his 18th birthday.
Horwood came from the village of Hanham on the outskirts of Bristol and his family and friends pleased for the release of his body for burial. But Dr. Smith, whose role appears to have been malevolent indeed, refused. He requisitioned the body for his medical research. Conveniently it saved him from any allegations over his disastrous operation on Eliza.
Worse indignity was to follow. Dr. Smith dissected John’s body in front of 80 people at a medical class and had his skin flayed. A tanner then turned it into leather to cover a book produced by Dr. Smith containing the transcript of the murder trial. Dr. Smith kept the skeleton at his Bristol home, with a noose around the neck, until it was later moved to Bristol University.
So the years passed until genealogist Mary Halliwell, Horwood’s great-great-great-great niece, found the letters from his parents pleading for a proper burial. She resolved to see justice done and john lain to rest at last.
She traced his skeleton to a cupboard at the university, the noose still in place, and was declared the legal owner. In a black coffin, John was poignantly taken through the High Street of Hanham and buried in the village graveyard before 50 mourners.
The wrong caused by a pebble had at last been righted ― after 190 years.
Source: True Crime Winter Special

autopsynecropsy:

A pebble and 190 years of tragedy

Who could have dreamt that the throwing of a pebble by a jilted teenage lover could have such consequences?

On a country hillside near Bristol, John Horwood, 17, saw his sweetheart Eliza walking out with another love. In his frustration, he picked up a pebble and threw it at her. 

By a curse of fate, his aim was too accurate. It hit Eliza on her right temple. She fell into a brook and later went to Bristol Royal Infirmary to get the small wound dressed properly.

But the chief surgeon Richard Smith said it had become infected and decided to operate. His method was trephining  or, put more crudely, drilling a hole in her head to relieve the pressure of the infection. His treatment caused an abscess and seven days later Eliza Balsum died.

Dr. Smith alerted the police and the hapless stone thrower was brought to trial at the Star Inn in Bedminster, Bristol, for murder. The year was 1821 and, in an incredible decision to modern eyes, he was sentenced to death and hanged at New Bristol Gaol on April 13th, three days after his 18th birthday.

Horwood came from the village of Hanham on the outskirts of Bristol and his family and friends pleased for the release of his body for burial. But Dr. Smith, whose role appears to have been malevolent indeed, refused. He requisitioned the body for his medical research. Conveniently it saved him from any allegations over his disastrous operation on Eliza.

Worse indignity was to follow. Dr. Smith dissected John’s body in front of 80 people at a medical class and had his skin flayed. A tanner then turned it into leather to cover a book produced by Dr. Smith containing the transcript of the murder trial. Dr. Smith kept the skeleton at his Bristol home, with a noose around the neck, until it was later moved to Bristol University.

So the years passed until genealogist Mary Halliwell, Horwood’s great-great-great-great niece, found the letters from his parents pleading for a proper burial. She resolved to see justice done and john lain to rest at last.

She traced his skeleton to a cupboard at the university, the noose still in place, and was declared the legal owner. In a black coffin, John was poignantly taken through the High Street of Hanham and buried in the village graveyard before 50 mourners.

The wrong caused by a pebble had at last been righted  after 190 years.

Source: True Crime Winter Special

Posted 2 days ago

sugarmeows:

A bust of German composer Ludwig Van Beethoven standing in the room in which he was born in 1770

Photograph by Alfred Eisenstaedt (Bonn, Germany; 1934)

(Source: legrandcirque)

Posted 2 days ago
Posted 3 days ago

japaneseaesthetics:

Growling Bear Kawari Kabuto. Muromachi Period, Circa 16th Century, Japan

Posted 3 days ago